The Very Hungry Caterpillar and “Winter Dreams”

The Very Hungry Caterpillar and “Winter Dreams”

Compare and Contrast Rough Draft on Winter Dreams, and The Very Hungry Caterpillar. The children’s book The Very Hungry Caterpillar and the adult novel Winter Draft are almost impossible to relate in obvious terms, for one character is a man coming of age, and the other is a caterpillar. Both stories however are able to be compared and contrasted when both themes are put back to back for examination.

Ultimately, Winter Dreams and The Very Hungry Caterpillar are compatible to each other wrought the theme of why they desired what they desired, the object being desired, and the character’s outcome and how it affects the theme. Both Dexter and the caterpillar had a greedy hunger for things in order to achieve their ultimate goal. For the caterpillar eating to satisfy his everlasting hunger, was all in order to become a butterfly at the climax of his existence. Dexter however, gained wealth and knowledge in order to obtain his biggest desire; Judy.

Both obsessions of becoming the butterfly ND having Judy eventually drove both characters to disaster. Nonetheless, the caterpillar had a moment of realization, which was gained after the caterpillar became sick from eating too much food. Later the caterpillar goes back to eating a leave and is automatically cured and ready to become a butterfly. Dexter fails to have a moment of realization until the end when it is too late and he had turned down marriage and Judy had become unattractive and married.

Becoming the butterfly as the final goal of the caterpillar, as much as having Judy was Tester’s greatest desire. Judy was every man’s greatest desire, yet she was rude, spoiled, and self- centered. Because being a butterfly was the caterpillar’s life’s climax, Judy represents desire that is not worth striving for, and becoming the butterfly is achieving maximum happiness. The butterfly and Dexter both gained the requirements to met their goals but Tester’s desire for Judy was proved to be in vain .