Teenage Drinking

Teenage Drinking

English 111-105 September 2013 The Night I Will Never Forget It was April 24, 2010; we all sat in a small waiting room at Baptist Hospital nervously and anxiously waiting for any news. The least bit of movement in the hallway would get our hearts racing and blood pumping. Most of us were still in shock from what had happened the previous night. We were still trying to convince ourselves that it wasn’t her in that car, that they had the wrong person. It had Just been a birthday party she was going to, not a party with alcohol, but somehow alcohol had shown up, and she got caught up in it.

Her first drink led to another and that one to another; it felt good, at least for a while, but while she was busy “enjoying life,” she had no clue what was about to happen next, something that would affect the lives of many people forever. She was a typical girl, much like her mother; long brown hair, green eyes, and an olive skin tone, the quiet type, that is until she got to know people. She always had a sneaky grin on her face, especially when she was golfing. It was almost like she knew she was going to have a better score than everybody else.

On the weekends, if she wasn’t golfing, she was out with friends or Emily, and right by her side was her best friend, Blake. She loved that boy like he was the only one in the world for her. Although she had dealt with having divorced parent’s and faced several trials, she had lived a Joyous life. She always kept up her faith and never doubted that God had placed her in certain situations for a reason. In grade school she always made good grades and stayed out of trouble as well as in her first two years in college.

She prepared for most of the changes well, but what she had not prepared for was the night her world and that of many others came raising down: that party. It was on the night of April 23, 2010; she had Just come down the mountain from Appalachian State University for her weekend visit home. Tonight she had decided she was going over to a friend’s house for a birthday party. As she arrived, the loud noise of music and teens laughing would fill her mind. It wasn’t the first time she had ever been too party or had a couple sips of a drink, but this time she had driven herself.

Usually she was going with Blake, or she was going to stay the night at her friend’s house, but since she hadn’t been home in about two seeks, she figured she would head home after a while. She told her mom not to wait up for her that night because she was going to a friend’s house and would be home late. As the night progressed, more people kept showing up with some type of alcohol or drugs. She didn’t think that a couple drinks would hurt anything, that Just a few couldn’t affect her too much that she couldn’t drive home.

At about 3:00 A. M. She told her friends goodbye and headed home. She had driven her 2007 Chevy Cobalt down the road about thirty minutes when something went wrong. She lost control of ere car, hit the side rail of a bridge, and flipped several times. A lady who lived in a nearby house was awakened by the noise and ran outside to find a serious accident. Quickly the lady went to call 911 and made her way to the scene of the accident to check on whomever was in the car. No one was in or around the car though.

She looked around some Ana Tuna Eastern lying on a little noels, not Treating nor conscious. The lady sat with her and told her everything was going to be okay, that help was on the way, and she would be there until help came. The rescue squad, ambulance, firemen and police officers arrived, and they had called in a helicopter to a nearby landing pad to airlift her to a trauma hospital. The family was called and informed of the accident and that Kathy had been airlifted to Baptist Hospital.

For the family, that was the longest car ride of their lives. Feelings of nervousness and fear rushed into their lives all of a sudden. How could this be their daughter and granddaughter? Doubt, denial, rejection, there was no way this was happening to them. As they arrived at the hospital, they were in a frantic search to find Kathy or anyone who knew of her condition. They finally found her and went into her room where she had already been placed on life support. Tears filled the eyes of her family when they saw her helpless body lying still.

The doctor came in and gave them the news that if she lived, she would be like a vegetable and unable to do anything. Morning came, and the family was still hoping and praying that she would pull through this with God’s help. Finally, it was time to make an important decision; do they keep her on life support longer, or do they let her go now? The choice was made o let her go home to be with her Savior. They all gathered in her room saying their doubles; telling their best memories and saying I love you trying to hold back the tears.

They pulled the plug, and there was not a dry eye in the room. What had taken their loved one? What was she doing on that road so late? An autopsy was done on Astrakhan’s body; she had a blood alcohol level of . 04, not an illegal limit, but enough to affect her driving. The investigators of the scene came to a conclusion about the accident. Kathy had not been wearing her seat belt and was ejected from the car. Evidence showed that she may have unbuckled to get her cell phone, which had fallen in the floor, and she had lost control of the car, hitting the side rail.

The speed limit on that road was forty-five miles per hour, but the recommended speed limit through the curves was thirty-five miles per hour. Kathy was going close to fifty-five miles per hour through the curves. The autopsy proved she had been drinking, but the real cause of her accident, we will never know. A tall wooden cross stands in the spot where Kathy lay that night. Flowers, teddy bears, and balloons cover the little listed. A beautiful, intelligent, nineteen year old young woman lost her life that night due to carelessness.

To the world she is Just another statistic, but we lost a friend that night, something that can never be replaced, but could have been prevented. No, it doesn’t happen to everyone who drinks and drives, but those who do it are putting themselves at a higher risk of an accident. Before teenagers take a drink, they need to stop and ask themselves, “Who is this going to affect besides myself? ” Drinking is something that can affect the lives of many people in many ways … Forever.