Puritans and Indians

Puritans and Indians

Struggles Have you ever faced the many difficulties that come with moving to a whole new environment? In our country history, people had to face many hardships when they shifted their lifestyle. The Puritans were on a ship for four months to come to a completely different country. Although in “Museum Indians” she moved within the United States, it was still a culture shock from moving from the reservation in South Dakota to the city of Chicago. The Puritans and Indians were both challenged by obstinate events that created physical danger, as well as emotional dissatisfaction.

While crossing the Atlantic Ocean, the Puritans endured many physical challenges. They sailed across the rough water causing them to have to Just go with the flow of the ocean. In “Plymouth Plantation” it states, “In sundry of these storms the winds were so fierce, and the seas so high, as they could not bear a knot of sail, but were forced to hull for diverse days together” (Bradford 59). Due to the voyage conditions, the Puritans suffered many illnesses and seasickness.

Bradford wrote, “But that which was most sad and lamentable was that in two or three months time, Alfa of their company died, especially in January and February, being the depth of winter, and wanting houses and other comforts; being infected with the scurry and other diseases, which this long voyage and their unaccommodating conditions had brought upon them; so as there died sometimes two or three of a day, in the aforesaid time, that of one hundred and odd persons, scare fifty remained” (Bradford 61). People were dying quickly, and only about half of the Puritans made it to Plymouth alive.

A trip across the ocean is a very treacherous and dangerous trip. In “Museum Indians”, the mother experienced a major environmental transformation. Even though her relocation was within the same country, she witnessed an extreme culture shock. The story tells us, “She had never been on a train before, or used a telephone, she left Standing Rock to take a Job in Chicago so she could help out the family during war” (Power 36). The mother had to learn how to adapt to the city life rather than her home on the reservation.

They didn’t own a car, so they had to use public transportation or walk anywhere they wanted to go. Living in the city was definitely an adjustment to the mother’s life. When the Puritans sailed to the New World, they were forced to face many emotional struggles and letdowns. They were required to create a new community and lived without their whole family. The loss of family members during the voyage, and leaving some in England, dampened the excitement of the religious freedom they were seeking. Since they had to leave everything back home, they were obligated to become friends with the Indians for survival.

It is evident that moving to a new entry causes emotional stress. Upon a visit to the museum, the mother realizes that Chicago is not where she belongs. The daughter said, “My mother belongs in a grand buckskin dress such as this, even though her hair is now too short to braid and has been trained to curl at the ends in a saucy flip” (Power 36). Seeing the grandmother’s dress caused the mother great sadness. I nee mother NAS change near Testily to NT near new location, but she notices that she is not being true to herself.

It is noticeable that when the Puritans in “Plymouth Plantation” and the mother in Museum Indians” transformed their lifestyles, they were confronted by physical and emotional hardships. Both stories reveal the theme “Home is where the heart is. ” The Puritans home is really in England, but they’re trying to overcome the daily adversities in the New World. The mother is living in Chicago to help her family, but she belongs in South Dakota. It is undeniable that our country past has experience many changes to they way of life, but their determination has shaped America to the wonderful country is it today.