Pediatric vision screening

Pediatric vision screening

For the younger children we had to give simple nomads to step on the scale and how to stand under the stationmaster. Some stood face forward instead of their back against the ruler. The older children were eager to know their vital statistics to compare with their classmates. For some it seemed like a competition as to who was taller. At the second school we did the distant vision screening and had different charts depending on the age group. The younger children simply had to read T, V, O, H, etc for both eyes, one at a time, while the 5th grade students had a separate group of letters for each eye.

There were no nursing skills per SE for this experience. We used patience, care, and friendly attitudes towards the students. We made conversations with the students as an ice breaker prior to the task at hand such as complimenting them on their clothing or hair, etc. My specific task was to use the stationmaster. I ensured the student looked straight ahead and their shoes were flat. At the second school I was the chart attendant and pointed to the letters for the children. The role of the nurse in the school screening as to act like a triage nurse.

She asked about allergies or any medical problems. (One child stated he was allergic to snakes and tigers! ) At the first school the nurse had a boundary to ensure privacy during the interview. This was not evident at the 2nd school as the location for the screening was quite inadequate. She also performed a near vision test using a card to be held at a distance of 14 inches from the eyes. During the screening she also examined a wound on a leg. For some students this was their only source of medical care.

Some major health concerns of the students were seizures, allergies, diabetes, obesity, poor vision, and general hygiene. The nurse made a note to call one mother when the student stated he has an penne but it was left at home. The parent was going to be contacted to bring an penne to school for use at the school if needed. The benefits of this rotation was to enlighten us on the pediatric population in the county. It showed that there are undeserved areas as far as health care is concerned.

Education is needed as far as roper nutrition for children such as healthy foods and serving sizes. Several children will need to be rescanned as they did not pass this initial screening. Some children had uncorrected vision from previous years and still did not have corrective aware. Perhaps the cost of obtaining a prescription for glasses as well as the glasses themselves are the issue. Even some children that wore glasses did not pass their screening as their prescription needs renewing. It was a very EYE OPENING experience! Pediatric vision screening By Stefan-Parker