Biyaheng Sikmura

Biyaheng Sikmura

We had seen a documentary of Filipinos who travel on foot Just to satisfy their hunger. From daylight to midnight, they set their courses on different areas where the feeding programs are. These feeding programs are sponsored by churches of different religions. According to what we’ve watched, the program has been their routine because there is no other choice than to help these dirt-poor people. Since there are a lot of people who suffer from extreme poverty and cannot even provide or their own food, these feeding centers cannot accommodate all people who would go to their centers for food.

Due to that, the people from the documentary are always rushing to get to these centers and have their names listed so that they could have their food–to them, TIME IS GOLD. They would never let any minute get wasted for nothing. As a result, they never stayed in a place longer than an hour. After getting their food, they usually hasten to another area where there is a feeding program. From what we saw, we can say that this has become more than a habit. It is their routine.

The severity of economic crisis that beset the Philippines has geared to a great magnitude that it has caused hopelessness and turmoil to people in the depressed communities. In coping up with the fast pace of economic upheaval, the needy are left gasping, yearning, wanting. Programs are to be adopted for the benefit of the economically handicapped people. They must be given seminars on interpersonal ark relationships, values formation, and ethics for them to attain a level of growth in various aspects of life.

The livelihood training process is a skill-training program that will cater the residents of depressed areas whose income falls below the poverty line, the out-of-school youth and the unemployed. Skills training courses may include the following: Homemade ice cream, dish garden making, Christmas ideas and decors, native delicacies making, meat, fruit and fish processing, cellophane repair. Not only will these courses help them get some money, UT will also keep them busy to prevent them for loitering on the streets.

We must understand the problem if we are going to be part of the solution. Poverty of some sort, spiritual or material, will always be with us, but it doesn’t have to be long-term poverty. It’s imperative that we not only act to care for the short-term needs of the poor, but that we direct our attention to the long-term solution: better functioning markets, which will improve the lives of everyone, rich and poor alike. Benching Kumara By Curran