APUSH Outline

APUSH Outline

Telling the “story’ only completes part of your Job. You need to communicate an event’s significance, not Just its details. The following tips’ section attempts to give you some ideas on how to present insightful entries. Since our textbook is designed for an AP course it remains the best source for finding the critical information that relates to these events. Reading the text provides you with a concise source for the questions, events and developments in the outlines, essays and in-class work. Ask top-flight students from years past and hey will confirm this advice.

Why the event occurred: Often background information is crucial to understanding why an event took place. Detail the major issues debated: Include the ideas expressed, and if they fit into a reticular philosophy (liberal; conservative; Republican; Jackson; anti-communist) note it. Specifically arrest ten quietest: many entries come In ten Tort AT ten quietest. You need to pay attention to the question in order to properly tailor the text’s information. Once again Just repeating random information related to the event will not be sufficient.

Identify people, ideas, nations or groups involved: A very brief explanation of whom they were or their views are particularly useful. Always put a person or group’s full name the first time you mention them. (Doing otherwise is often a sign of copying. Understanding of historical context: A very high-level skill where you demonstrate that certain ideas were normal for their times or were throwbacks to an earlier era or forerunners of future ideas. (I. E. Views of the poor, minorities, women or the role of government. Impact: To measure impact, look at who benefited or lost during the event. What trends were continued or altered? Did it aid a particular group politically, financially or in terms of freedom? Use the Topics: Each event is placed in a particular topic (the Roman numerals) to help you see how it fits into the larger scheme of events. Recognizing categories will be extremely helpful in organizing your essays. These topics should be the starting point for your essay brainstorming. The Forest: Can you recognize and present how an event (a tree) fits into a larger issue (the forest)?

Amendments, Bills and Acts: Background that explains why they were created. Who promoted or blocked their passage? Why did they pass? Summarize the impact of the new laws. Battles: Be very brief on the actual fighting and strategy. Put your emphasis on how the battle altered momentum of the war. Court Cases: Briefly summarize the case, but more importantly explain the Court’s calicles Ana Its Impact on a particular Issue. Include the date for all entries: D-Day (1944) or Specie Circular (1837) This outline includes how you should divide the items up with your partner. Use this as a model for future outlines.