aeneid

aeneid

Aeneid Exam Friday Dec. 13th 9-11 am The format of this exam will be a combination of passage identification (like the quizzes) and a prepared essay question. Part l: Passage Identification (20 points): This part of the exam will be exactly like the Aeneid quiz. You will be asked to identify the context of 5 out 7 passages from the Aeneid. Each passage will be worth 4 points. Part II: Prepared Essay question (80 points): Choose ONE of the following questions to prepare for the exam. Your essay should have a well-thought out answer that is clearly supported by examples from the text.

You may bring a 1 sheet of notes (normal size paper) to the exam. Your notes may simply be notes, an outline, or select passages to discuss. You MAY NOT come to the exam with the essay already written out. I will ask you to turn in your page of notes along with the exam. You should plan on discussing AT LEAST THREE passages in your essay, but the number can be more. Make sure you answer all parts of the question. You will be expected to spell character names, places, or events correctly. 1. Fate is a crucial concept in the Aeneid. Look for places in the text were it is entioned and discuss what you think Virgil meant by “fate. Do you think his concept of fate is like other uses of fate in our readings? Why do you think Virgil uses fate as a prominent theme? Use specific passages from the text(s) to support your ideas. 2. In Book I of the Aeneid, the hero Aeneas is presented as a new kind of hero, one motivated by duty. Compare Aeneas to either Achilles, Odysseus, or Gilgamesh, who do what they please and often get the gods to aid them. Why are they such different sorts of heroes? How does Aeneas compare with Hector? Use specific examples from the texts to support your ideas. “Some critics choose to believe that Virgil had no choice but to praise the strong man; others argue that he was a bootlicking toady who knew where the stipends came from; still others believe that he acknowledged but lamented the historical necessity for Augustus” (Beye, 227-228). Based on your reading of the Aeneid, what is the right view to take of the propaganda question? Is it legitimate to value the artistic qualities of a piece of literature without reference to its content, or is that tantamount to admiring the technique with which a racist slogan has been painted on a bathroom wall?

Pay particular attention to these passages: 1 . 454-73; 6. 896-1063; 8. 716-840 the battlefield. Earlier, Aeneas, describing his futile efforts to fght for Troy, had recalled how he rushed into battle thinking “how glorious it is to die in combat” (2. 374). One of the great poets of World War l, Wilfred Owen, used part of a phrase from the Roman poet, Horace, as the title of a bitterly ironic poem (Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori/it is fine and sweet to die for one’s country) and called it that “old lie”. Look up one of the war poems of Wilfred Owen and compare his descriptions and views of war to those expressed in the Aeneid.