Administer medication to individuals, and monitor the effects

Administer medication to individuals, and monitor the effects

1 – Understand legislation, policy and procedures relevant to administration of – Identify current legislation, guidelines policies and protocols relevant to the 1. 1 administration of medication The Medicines Acts 1968 and various amendments cover the legal management of medication. While care staff are not expected to have detailed knowledge of the legislation, they do need to be aware of the legal difference between types of medication and the legal framework that allows them to handle medicines on behalf of and administer to the service user.

The current legislation, guidelines policies and protocols relevant to the administration of medication are; * The Medicines Act 1968 * The Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 * The Misuse of Drugs (Safe Custody) Regulations 1973 Sl 1973 No 798 as amended by Misuse of Drugs Regulations 2001 * The NHS Scotland Pharmaceutical Service (Regulations) 1995 * The Social Work Act 1968 as amended by The Regulation of care Act 2001 * The Children Act 1989 * The Children’s Act 1995 * The Data Protection Act 1998 * The Care Standards Act 2000 The Regulation of Care Act 2001 * The Health and Social Care Act 2001 * Adults with Incapacity Act 2000 90 Social Care Association * The Health Act 200 * Health and Safety at Work Act (1974) * The Control of Substances Hazardous to health Regulations (1999-COSHH) * Hazardous Waste Regulations (2005) * Mental Capacity Act (2005) * The Access to health records Act (1990) 2 – Know about common types of medication and their use 2. 1 – describe common types of medication including their effects and potential side effects Paracetamol Side effects of paracetamol are rare but can include erythematous or urticarial rashes, fever, nausea and mucosal lesions. Even more rarely, they can include eutropenia, thrombocytopenia and pancytopenia. Ferrous sulphate Possible side effects are allergic reaction e. g. itchy skin rash, swelling of the face, lips, tongue or throat, or difficulty breathing or swallowing,constipation occasionally causing faecal impaction, diarrhoea, stomach pain, feeling sick and blackened stools.

Aspirin Possible side effects are black, bloody, or tarry stools, coughing up blood or vomit that ooks like coffee grounds, severe nausea, vomiting, or stomach pain, fever lasting longer than 3 days, swelling, or pain lasting longer than 10 days; or hearing problems, ringing in your ears. Less serious side effects of aspirin may include upset Codeine, used for pain relief, side effects can be light-headedness, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, shortness of breath, and sedation. Codeine can also cause allergic reactions, symptoms of which include constipation, abdominal pain, rash and itching. Antibiotics Amoxicillin, a penicillin based antibiotic which fights bacteria in your body. It can only be taken if you are not allergic to Penicillin and do not have asthma, liver or kidney disease, or a history of diarrhoea caused by antibiotics.

It is used to treat many different types of infections, such as ear infections, bladder infections, pneumonia, and salmonella however it can cause side effects including sores inside your mouth, fever, swollen glands, Joint pain, muscle weakness, severe blistering, peeling, and red kin rash, yellowed skin, yellowing of the eyes, dark colored urine, confusion or weakness, easy bruising, and vaginal itching. Anti-hypertensive Lisonopril used for lowering blood pressure, it is also effective in the treatment of congestive heart failure, and to improve survival after a heart attack. Not to be used by people with liver or kidney disease, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis. Side effects can include feeling faint, restricted urination, stomach swelling, and flu like symptoms, heart palpitations, chest pains, skin rash, depressed mood, vomiting and diarrhoea.